Caerphilly

Manchester to Caerphilly with us

We provide Saloon Cars, Estate Cars, Executive cars and minibuses. Our drivers are all experienced local drivers who will make your transfer smooth and enjoyable. We can also offer a ‘meet and greet’ service at your request. Our services are available 24/7 with staff at hand to attend to any queries you may have, whether it be before or after you have made a booking.

A ‘Meet and Greet’ service can be arranged when booking whereby the driver will be in arrivals with the passenger’s name or company name, whichever you prefer. A comforting thought, especially for first time visitors in a foreign country.

If your flight is early or subject to delays, we will track your flight’s progress and send your driver at the new expected time of arrival.

A lot of our work is corporate based so if you are booking a taxi for other people you need not worry, we will give them the professional quality service they would expect. We can send receipts via email on request.

Remember, this is a set fare, no taxi meters, no hidden charges, regardless of the route or time taken from Manchester.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION – PLEASE READ! We advise booking as early as possible to avoid disappointment. If your transfer is within the next 12 hours please call us the number given on top of the page.

Please ensure you book the correct taxi for your Manchester Airport or Around Manchester to Caerphilly journey. Vehicle capacity is indicated below:

Saloon Car

Oneway: £221.00

Return: £438.00

4x passengers 2x Suitcase 2x Hand Luggage

Estate Car

Oneway: £244.00

Return: £482.00

4x passengers 4x Suitcase 4x Hand Luggage

Executive Car

Oneway: £255.00

Return: £499.00

4x passengers 2x Suitcase 2x Hand Luggage

8 Seater Minibus

Oneway: £289.00

Return: £570.00

8x passengers 8x Suitcase 8x Hand Luggage


Overview of Caerphilly

Caerphilly is a town in South Wales, at the southern end of the Rhymney Valley. It is the largest town in Caerphilly (county borough). Historically it was in the county of Glamorgan, on the border with Monmouthshire. At the 2001 Census, the town had a population of 30,388. It is a commuter town for Cardiff and Newport, 7.5 miles (12 km) and 12 miles (19 km) away respectively, and is separated from the Cardiff suburbs of Lisvane and Rhiwbina by Caerphilly mountain and gives its name to Caerphilly cheese
The town’s site has long been of strategic significance. Around AD 75 a fort was built by the Romans during their conquest of Britain. An excavation of the site in 1963 showed that the fort was occupied by Roman forces until the middle of the 2nd century.
Tradition states that a monastery was built in the area by St Cenydd, but this claim lacks support. Nonetheless, the district was formerly named Senghenydd after him, and Cenydd’s son, St Ffili, is said to have built a fort (Welsh: caer) in the area and thus gave the town its name. Another explanation is that it is named after the Anglo-Norman Marcher Lord, Philip de Braose.
Following the Norman invasion of Wales in the late 11th century, the area of Sengenhydd remained in Welsh hands. By the middle of the 12th century the area was under the control of the Welsh chieftain Ifor Bach (Ifor ap Meurig). His grandson Gruffydd ap Rhys was the final Welsh lord of Sengenhydd, falling to the English nobleman Gilbert de Clare, the Red Earl, in 1266. In 1267 Henry III was forced to recognise Llywelyn ap Gruffudd as Prince of Wales, and by September 1268 Llywelyn had secured northern Sengenhydd. Gilbert de Clare had already begun to take steps to consolidate his own territorial gains, beginning the construction of Caerphilly Castle on 11 April 1268. The castle would also act as a buffer against Llewelyn’s own territorial ambitions and was attacked by the Prince of Wales’ forces before construction was halted in 1270. Construction recommenced in 1271 and was continued under the Red Earl’s son, Gilbert de Clare, 8th Earl of Gloucester. With only interior remodelling carried out to the castle by Hugh le Despenser in the 1320s, Caerphilly Castle remains a pure example of 13th century military architecture and is the largest castle in Wales, and the second largest in Britain (after Windsor).
The original town of Caerphilly grew up as a small De Clare raised settlement just south of the castle. In 1316 Llywelyn Bren, believed to be the son of Gruffyd ap Rhys and therefore great-grandson of Ifor Bach, led an insurrection, laying siege to the castle. The outer ward of the castle was breached but not the inner defences, with the town itself burned. The town was rebuilt but remained very small throughout the Middle Ages. The first evidence of its emerging importance was the construction of a Court House in the 14th century, the only pre-19th century building still remaining in the town.
At the beginning of the 15th century the castle was again attacked, this time by Owain Glyndŵr, who took control of the castle around 1403-05. Repairs to the castle continued until at least 1430, but just a century later the antiquary John Leland recorded that the castle was a ruin set in marshland, with a single tower being used as a prison. In the mid-16th century the 2nd Earl of Pembroke used the castle as a manorial court, but in 1583 the castle was leased to Thomas Lewis, who accelerated the castle’s dilapidation by removing stonework to build his nearby manor, The Van. The Lewis family, who claimed descent from Ifor Bach, left the manor in the mid-18th century when they purchased St Fagans Castle, The Van falling into decay.
During the 1700s, Caerphilly began to grow into a market town, and during the 19th century, as the South Wales valleys underwent massive growth through industrialisation, so to the town’s population grew. Caerphilly railway station was opened in 1871, and in 1899 the Rhymney Railway built their Caerphilly railway works maintenance facilities; however, the expansion of the population in the 19th century was more to do with the increasing market for coal

Caerphilly Hotel Addresses:

Will update soon